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LPFM Radio Station Staffers Rescued in Rath of Hurricane Isaac

Radio Station Staff Rescued from Hurricane Isaac

Hurricane Isaac will be remembered for its heavy rains along the Gulf Coast. For Biloxi Mississippi low-power FM WQRZ-LP, which refers to itself as “Katrina Radio”, even a building nine feet off the ground wasn’t enough to stay dry. After eight inches of water filled the station, local emergency management officials were needed to rescue four WQRZ-LP volunteers. The Sun Herald reports the LPFM was honored by President Bush for its service after Hurricane Katrina.

Shiver Me Timbers

Pirate Radio Station Tells FCC to go Walk a Plank

BY KEVIN BRASS

Deborah Stevens with radio co-host Randall Kelton at the Travis County courthouse

Nine months after the Federal Com­mun­i­ca­tions Commission moved to shut down an unlicensed Austin radio broadcast, the pirate station is still on the air, openly defying the government order.

“I’m not giving up, because this is about the truth,” said Deborah Stevens, the public voice behind the station, as she eats quiche at a South Austin diner. Her voice rises a couple of octaves when she mentions “the truth,” Barack Obama’s birth certificate, or “the cartel” – especially the cartel. “It’s all about the cartel, the monopoly cartel, the Texas Association of Broadcasters and the FCC protecting their cartel illegally,” said Stevens, part of a group loosely known as Radio Free Austin.For more than a decade, the group has used frequencies at 90.1FM and 100.1FM to broadcast shows discussing what they see as the government cover-up of 9/11, the growth of the police state, and the accuracy of various prophecies. Their guru is Alex Jones, self-styled leader of Infowars, man’s last hope against the much-discussed and constantly feared New World Order. Some commuters may know the station from the handmade signs touting liberty and the station’s frequency occasionally unfurled on a fence along MoPac, north of Downtown.

Last November the FCC ordered Stevens and her husband, Jerry, to pay a $10,000 “forfeiture” for operating the station without a license. Also fined was former Travis County Sheriff Raymond Frank, 84, who served as sheriff in the Seventies and ran for the post again in 2008 on a platform that included reducing penalties for marijuana possession. For many years, the station broadcast from a transmitter on an old 80-foot-tall wind tower on Frank’s Mount Larson property.

How Pussy Riot Became P***y Riot: The FCC’s Sexual Obscenity Rules Are Bullshit

Near naked women "Pussy Riot" protesting FCC profanity rules

When George Carlin released his famous monologue, “Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television,” in 1972, it didn’t include the word “pussy.” Although his list didn’t reflect all the words you couldn’t say on TV at the time, the ones he chose were enough to incite the wrath of the FCC and became fodder for a subsequent Supreme Court case on the government’s right to censor and control broadcast “indecency.” He later expanded the list to over two hundred words commonly deemed inappropriate, which he read aloud to audiences from a long scroll.

FCC Complaint Filed Against Manchester PD

FCC Commissioners CourtThe follow was sent in an email with the subject line “Wiretapping complaint” by Wallace Nolen to fccinfo@fcc.gov on August 15th, 2012.

[Nolen, by the way, is the admin of the new Vermont Cop Block offshoot.]

This writing shall constitute a formal complaint against the City of Manchester NH Police Department for failing to notify me that the department records most incoming calls on non-emergency telephone lines without either a beep tone or other verbal notification whatsoever that such call(s) are being recorded in violation of federal laws, regulations and/or FCC tariffs.

see: http://www.fcc.gov/guides/recording-telephone-conversations

I have placed over two dozen telephone calls where I was physically located in the State of Vermont (where I live) and about 4 telephone calls where was physically located in New Hampshire.  In all cases the calls were made from telephone numbers within the (802) area code so they knew or should have know that these were or may have been INTERSTATE CALLS.

NCTA petitions FCC to omit promos and noncommercial content from the CALM Act

The CALM Act — the new law to regulate the level of television audio content — is set to go into effect Dec. 13. The National Cable & Telecommunications Association (NTCA) has asked the FCC to limit the new rule only to commercial spots.

The trade group, in an FCC filing, has asked the FCC to omit “promotional material” from the CALM rules, saying it will place too great burden on television operators. In addition, the NTCA wants clarification from the commission that a cable operator will not be held liable in instances in which it has notified a network and the FCC of a network’s noncompliance with the CALM Act.

“The Commission mistakenly conflates ‘commercial advertisements’ and promos, defining promos as ‘commercial advertisements promoting television programming,’” the NCTA said. “In fact, promos are distinct from ‘commercial advertisements.’ Generally, commercial advertisements are material transmitted in exchange for some type of payment or remuneration, while promos are not.”